Monthly Archives: February 2013

The Art of Writing

The sec­ond sen­tence holds hands with the first and reaches out to the third.”

And the first, nat­u­rally enough, must start with a word. So sit down and write one! Sage advice offered by renowned author Tom Rob­bins at the WordSmit­ten Writ­ing Work­shop, at which I was hon­ored to sit on the same panel. Another Rob­bins nugget: “Lan­guage is not the frost­ing, it’s the cake.”

Tom Rob­bins

Is there any­thing like a writ­ers’ work­shop to inspire writ­ers to plunk down and get some more words on the com­puter screen – or paper? Rob­bins, by the way, still writes long­hand on a legal pad, with his dog curled up next to him. So what­ever works for you! (As I write this, my cat Lucy Mir­a­cle is purring on my left thigh. I don’t get writer’s block, I get writer’s cramps from try­ing to accom­mo­date the var­i­ous crit­ters who want to cud­dle.) But I digress…

WordSmit­ten Media, like all of us, is scram­bling to keep up with the rapidly chang­ing method­ol­ogy of pub­lish­ing and deliv­er­ing con­tent. Kate Sul­li­van, the dynamo in charge, has a bedrock phi­los­o­phy that does not shift with the land­scape. It is that “we have the one sus­tain­able idea that will endure. The Story. We believe in sto­ries. We believe in the writ­ten word. We are WordSmitten.”

I share that phi­los­o­phy. We will always need con­tent, no mat­ter the for­mat or deliv­ery sys­tem. Those of us who cre­ate fic­tional con­tent might take heart from some of the wis­dom offered at the work­shop by Peter Dekom, an enter­tain­ment attor­ney in Bev­erly Hills. He posits that the folks who make movies are more drawn to books than they are to scripts these days. “Great nov­els are voyeurism and who wants to sneak a peek?” Dekom says show the reader some­thing they don’t usu­ally get to see, and who knows: Hol­ly­wood just might take notice.

Oh sure, lots of writ­ers say. Not likely, with all the com­pe­ti­tion out here. Heck, how many of us can even score an agent, let alone an edi­tor, let alone a pub­lish­ing house…so goes the think­ing and the ques­tion­ing when a bunch of aspir­ing authors get together. Nat­u­rally enough; it is a crowded, com­pet­i­tive field but if the joy of writ­ing is enough to keep you moti­vated, then you’re already mak­ing cake.

One of the writ­ers I most admire uses his con­sid­er­able language

Jonathan Balcombe and Cathy Unruh

Jonathan Bal­combe and Cathy Unruh

skills to show us things we don’t usu­ally get to see – and he’s not mak­ing them up. Jonathan Bal­combe takes us inside the hearts, minds and worlds of non-human ani­mals in books such as The Exul­tant Ark and Sec­ond Nature. Sci­ence lines up along­side vivid obser­va­tion to show us that all ani­mals expe­ri­ence plea­sure and pain and, as Jonathan would say, “have biogra­phies.” In other words, each and every ani­mal has a story. The life of each and every ani­mal means some­thing to that animal.

I was priv­i­leged to appear with Bal­combe at the Florida Voices for Ani­mals annual Have a Heart din­ner and what a joy­ful evening it was! To watch slides of ani­mals at work and play in their habi­tats, hear their sto­ries and come to under­stand their sen­tience more deeply. To sit with a room­ful of peo­ple who devote much of their lives to bet­ter­ing the fates of non-human ani­mals on the planet we share. To enjoy entirely vegan food from soup to salad to heap­ing plate­ful of entrees to dessert. (Thank you, Trang Viet Cui­sine – it was fab­u­lous!) If only every­one knew how deli­cious vegan food can be, I think many more of the planet’s ani­mals could live in peace and not die to fill plates.

Here’s to com­pas­sion and cre­ativ­ity. Hey, how about a cre­atively com­pas­sion­ate lifestyle? Now that’s some­thing I could write about ☺.